NSW Health collaborative genomics grants announced

Six NSW research teams will receive support from the NSW Government to investigate the genomic underpinnings of disease, it was announced today.
NSW Health collaborative genomics grants announced

Minister for Medical Research Pru Goward (second from left) and Garvan's Deputy Director Prof Chris Goodnow with grant recipients (L-R) Prof Chris Semsarian, Dr Tony Roscioli, A/Prof Robyn Jamieson and Prof Andreas Zankl.

27 April 2016

Six NSW research teams will receive support from the NSW Government to investigate the genomic underpinnings of diverse diseases, it was announced today. The funding, which forms part of the 2015/16 NSW Health Genomics Collaborative Grants Program, was announced by Minister for Medical Research Pru Goward and NSW Premier Mike Baird, during a tour of Garvan’s Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics.

The successful projects were awarded for the study of:

  • Blinding genetic retinal dystrophies (led by Associate Professor Robyn Jamieson, University of Sydney);
  • Primary immunodeficiencies (led by Dr Tony Roscioli, Garvan Institute of Medical Research);
  • Gene identification in Mendelian disorders (led by Dr Tony Roscioli, Garvan Institute of Medical Research);
  • Severe epilepsy (led by Dr Tony Roscioli, Garvan Institute of Medical Research);
  • Genetic disorders of bone (led by Professor Andreas Zankl, Sydney Children’s Hospital Network); and
  • Inherited heart diseases (led by Professor Chris Semsarian, Centenary Institute).

In announcing the funding, Minister Goward said, “These grants will help our researchers continue to advance how patients can benefit from this groundbreaking science and the role genomics research can play in identifying individualised treatments based on a patient’s genetic makeup.”

Garvan’s Deputy Director, Professor Chris Goodnow, said that the grants were a far-reaching investment by NSW Health in the development of genomics expertise among the clinicians and researchers of NSW, and that the funding would ultimately enable families to benefit from the transformation of healthcare through genomics.

The NSW Genomics Collaborative Grants Program (an arm of the Sydney Genomics Collaborative) supports researchers as they undertake groundbreaking human genomic medicine research. The grants give NSW researchers access to whole genome sequencing services at the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics. In this, the second funding round for the program, $1.54 million was made available for the study of diseases caused predominantly by mutations in a single gene. 

Related Labs/Groups