Two Garvan scientist-animators shortlisted among world’s best

Every year the National Science Foundation (USA) runs an international competition, showcasing spectacular scientific visualizations. This year, Garvan science-animators, Dr Kate Patterson and Chris Hammang, are both competing for the Foundation’s top prize and the People's Choice Award.
Two Garvan scientist-animators shortlisted among world’s best

Still image from "Cancer is Not One disease"

17 November 2014

Every year the National Science Foundation (USA) runs an international competition, showcasing spectacular scientific visualizations in six categories (Photo, Illustration, Poster/Graphic, Game/App, and Video).

This year, two of the top ten contenders in the Video category come from Garvan’s Biodata Visualisation team, and a third comes from the Nature Publishing Group.

Garvan science-animators, Dr Kate Patterson and Chris Hammang, are both competing for the Science Foundation’s top prize, and your vote can help one of them secure the People’s Choice Award. Voting closes at 18:59 pm AEDT on 18 November. Click here to vote.

Make sure you take the time to enjoy these, as well as other, inspiring creations – after votes close, most entries will no longer be accessible.

Kate Patterson’s animation, "Cancer is Not One Disease" (see still image above and video below) describes how different mutations of DNA lead to many cancer types. Kate highlights the role of the tumour suppressor protein p53, known as ‘the guardian of the cell’, in the formation of cancer.

Still from Chris Hammang's animationChris Hammang’s animation 'The Hungry Microbiome’ (see still image left) describes how foods with resistant starch are digested and nourish your healthy gut bacteria, protecting against colorectal cancer, one of Australia’s biggest killers. Chris hopes viewers will see the importance of eating beans and other foods rich in resistant starch.

Kate and Chris used the same animation software as Dreamworks, Pixar Animation Studios and video game makers to create mesmerising magnifications of our interior molecular landscapes. While fantastic, the animations are not fantasies. They are well-researched 3D representations of what actually happens in our bodies at the micro scale.

Both animators are dedicated to the creation of awe-inspiring and scientifically accurate animations to engage and inspire a general audience. The animations were made as part of an Inspiring Australia project: a Federal government initiative, Australia's national strategy for engagement with the sciences.

 

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