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Risk factors for low birth weight in a socio-economically disadvantaged population: parity, marital status, ethnicity and cigarette smoking

Abstract

Low birth weight (LBW) is a public health problem, because it is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The principal aim of this study was to assess risk factors for LBW in a large multi-ethnic and socio-economically disadvantaged population. Data from 3242 mothers, who attended the Well Baby Clinic (Southwestern Sydney, Australia) for the first time, were analysed in relation to their demographic characteristics and socio-economic indices. The overall birthweight was 3377 +/- 577 g (mean +/- SD). In multiple linear regression analysis, smoking during pregnancy, marital status, parity, and country of birth were independently associated with birth weight. According to this analysis, lower birth weight was associated with mothers who had smoked during pregnancy (by 215.2 +/- 18.6 g), who were single (46.9 +/- 21 g), and of Asian background (108.5 +/- 38.2 g). However, higher parity was associated with significantly higher birth weight. The presence of each factor was coded as 1 and the absence, 0. A 'risk score' was then derived by summing up the individual scores. When birth weight was classified as 'low birth weight' (defined as those with birth weight being less than 2500 g) or normal birth weight, the overall prevalence of LBW was 1.9%. Each unit increase in the risk score was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.5-2.6) increase in the risk of LBW. These data suggest that apart from marital status, ethnicity and parity, maternal smoking is the single most important preventable risk factors for LBW.

Type Journal
ISBN 0393-2990 (Print)
Authors Phung, H.;Bauman, A.;Nguyen, T. V.;Young, L.;Tran, M.;Hillman, K. :
Garvan Authors Prof Tuan Nguyen
Publisher Name EUR J EPIDEMIOL
Published Date 2003-01-01 00:00:00
Published Volume 18
Published Issue 3
Published Pages 235-43
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=12800948
Status Published In-print