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TYPE 2 DIABETES

Type 2 diabetes is caused when the body is unable to use insulin effectively
About type 2 diabetes

What is Type 2 diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease marked by high levels of glucose or sugar in the blood. There are two types:

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce insulin to help regulate glucose.

Type 2 diabetes – or T2D – is caused when the body is unable to use insulin effectively and can be related to diet or lifestyle.

Key statistics

  • 85–90%
    T2D represents 85–90% of all cases of diabetes
  • Most Cases
    T2D is the fastest growing form of diabetes
  • Weight Risk
    Being overweight (with a BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing T2D
  • Gender Risk
    Men are at slightly increased risk of developing T2D
  • Lifestyle Risk & Genetics
    T2D is usually associated with an unhealthy lifestyle, coupled with a genetic predisposition

Garvan: a world-class centre for type 2 diabetes research

Globally there is a very high incidence of T2D, with more than 350 million sufferers worldwide. While there have been no new treatments for decades, at Garvan, new work is shedding light on the links between genetics, epigenetics, weight, metabolism and insulin resistance, to point the way to earlier and better prevention and more personalised treatment.

Garvan’s type 2 diabetes research is conducted in Garvan’s Diabetes and Metabolism Division, where nearly 100 research scientists and clinicians work together to understand the complexity of metabolic disease.

Latest Resources

VIDEO

Treating diabetes and obesity through brown fat

LATEST RESEARCH

Updates in metabolic diseases research

RISK CALCULATOR

Find out your risk of developing T2D within the next five years

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