Help equip our labs

With the help of donors like you, our scientists can continue transforming healthcare and saving lives.

When you make a donation to the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, you’re supporting an organisation that has been a nationally and internationally recognised centre of excellence in medical research for over 50 years.

 

With the help of donors like you, Garvan scientists have been able to play a major role in saving lives and changing the health of generations.  Here are some of the breakthroughs that investment in funding has enabled:

  • In 1973 we developed an insulin infusion technique that has saved the lives of people in diabetic comas.
  • In 1993 we made one of the top advances in breast cancer for that decade when we discovered the role of proteins called cyclins.
  • From 1999 to 2005 we developed methods to culture adult nerve stem cells capable of generating new brain cells, giving hope that some neurodegenerative diseases could be reversed.
  • In 2013 we sequenced the genomes of 100 pancreatic tumours and identified new mutations that lead to pancreatic cancer. This has already resulted in life-saving treatments.
  • In 2016 we launched Australia’s first clinical whole-genome sequencing service, tripling diagnostic rates for people living with rare and genetic conditions.

In order for Garvan scientists to continue making discoveries that lead to breakthroughs like these, we need your help.

For every dollar Garvan receives in government funding, we need to raise 70 cents to ensure our scientists’ laboratories are kept stocked with equipment that’s essential for their research.

Which is why your donation is so important – Helping equip our laboratories will help our scientists continue transforming healthcare and saving lives.

Help our scientists continue saving lives

$25

Will provide a rack of seven test tubes for one of our research labs

$100

Could pay for a box of petri dishes vital in finding breakthrough treatments

$400

Can provide a pair of reinforced cryo gloves so researchers can safely access -80˚c freezers

or enter your own amount