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Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

??????????????????????

Dianne Olds was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in February 2012, at the age of 66. She had had no previous symptoms, but suddenly developed jaundice and a blood test and scan confirmed the tumour.

‘I was told it was not operable and started on gemcitabine chemotherapy,’ said Dianne. A stent was fitted for the liver blockage, but Dianne suffered repeated infections requiring hospital admissions and the removal of her gallbladder.

Then Dianne was told of a study at Garvan using a combined chemotherapy of abraxane with gemcitabine. Although she couldn’t join the study, Dianne did opt to try this, even though the cost was almost $1000 per weekly dose.

‘After two months on the combined treatment, my tumour had shrunk so dramatically that surgery became an option,’ she said.

Dianne was able to have a Whipple’s operation (removal of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) in August 2012, followed by six weeks of radiotherapy and two more months of gemcitabine chemotherapy. ‘Certainly I was a few months recovering from all of this, which impacted greatly on my family, especially my husband, who took on the running of the house in addition to his own demanding job and getting me to appointments, but by the following May, I was well enough to travel to London for a month.

‘Although things are back to normal, I don’t take my recovery for granted. I am aware of many pancreatic cancer sufferers, close friends included, who died within a year of diagnosis. It is certainly the result of advances from the Garvan Institute and in surgical techniques that I am alive and well today.

‘During the Whipple’s operation tissue was taken for genetic analysis, meaning that should I have a recurrence, the treatment can be better tailored to my type of tumour. My journey with the disease has been easier and better informed because of these advances in research.

‘My extra time has been precious,’ said Dianne. ‘I have welcomed two more beautiful grandchildren. I have seen my eldest daughter graduate with a Master of Teaching and my son graduate with a Master of Music in London and launch his operatic career, and I have enjoyed many wonderful times with friends and family.’

Read more

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