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The costs of diabetes among Australians aged 45-64 years from 2015 to 2030: projections of lost productive life years (PLYs), lost personal income, lost taxation revenue, extra welfare payments and lost gross domestic product from Health&WealthMOD2030

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To project the number of people aged 45-64 years with lost productive life years (PLYs) due to diabetes and related costs (lost income, extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue); and lost gross domestic product (GDP) attributable to diabetes in Australia from 2015 to 2030. DESIGN: A simulation study of how the number of people aged 45-64 years with diabetes increases over time (based on population growth and disease trend data) and the economic losses incurred by individuals and the government. Cross-sectional outputs of a microsimulation model (Health&WealthMOD2030) which used the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers 2003 and 2009 as a base population and integrated outputs from two microsimulation models (Static Incomes Model and Australian Population and Policy Simulation Model), Treasury's population and labour force projections, and chronic disease trends data. SETTING: Australian population aged 45-64 years in 2015, 2020, 2025 and 2030. OUTCOME MEASURES: Lost PLYs, lost income, extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue, lost GDP. RESULTS: 18 100 people are out of the labour force due to diabetes in 2015, increasing to 21 400 in 2030 (18% increase). National costs consisted of a loss of $A467 million in annual income in 2015, increasing to $A807 million in 2030 (73% increase). For the government, extra annual welfare payments increased from $A311 million in 2015 to $A350 million in 2030 (13% increase); and lost annual taxation revenue increased from $A102 million in 2015 to $A166 million in 2030 (63% increase). A loss of $A2.1 billion in GDP was projected for 2015, increasing to $A2.9 billion in 2030 attributable to diabetes through its impact on PLYs. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals incur significant costs of diabetes through lost PLYs and lost income in addition to disease burden through human suffering and healthcare costs. The government incurs extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue and lost GDP, along with direct healthcare costs.

Type Journal
ISBN 2044-6055
Authors Schofield, D.; Shrestha, R. N.; Cunich, M. M.; Passey, M. E.; Veerman, L.; Tanton, R.; Kelly, S. J.
Publisher Name BMJ Open
Published Date 2017-01-09
Published Volume 7
Published Issue 1
Published Pages e013158
Status Published in-print
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013158
URL link to publisher's version http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/1/e013158
OpenAccess link to author's accepted manuscript version https://publications.gimr.garvan.org.au/open-access/14436