Skip to main content

Give a lasting gift this Christmas

Show your support with a gift that will last far beyond this Christmas.

Donate today   More

Why give a gift to research this Christmas?

 

This Christmas, consider giving the gift of of a donation to medical research in honour of a loved one. Not only will you be sharing an act of goodwill at Christmas, but you will also be helping to support medical research long beyond this Christmas and into the future.  

Your loved one will receive the gift of knowing they are making a direct difference to the future health of Australians. Your gift could help our scientists find better treatments for major diseases like cancer, osteoporosis, and diabetes that.

Give a gift that will make a lasting impact this Christmas. 

You can show your support with PayPal or by using the form below. 

 

What you'll get

 

For every $50 donated, you will receive a pack of 5 special Garvan cards that you can share with loved ones and family, to let them know you've made a gift in their honour. 

 

We're solving the most widespread diseases today for a healthier tomorrow.

Cancer 
Garvan scientists have uncovered a promising new approach to treating pancreatic cancer, by targeting the tissue around the tumour to make it
'softer' and more responsive to chemotherapy. 

Type 2 diabetes
Our team discovered that abdominal fat is a key risk factor for insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

Immunology 
Garvan scientists discovered a group of cells believed to trigger autoimmune disease, as well as the molecular 'trigger guard' that normally holds them in check.

Osteoporosis & Bone Biology
Garvan teams made the discovery that the brain hormone, Neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates bone growth and density. The joint project (with our Neuroscience Division) could lead to the development of new treatments for osteoporosis.

Neuroscience
The team has developed methods to culture adult nerve stem cells capable of generating new brain cells, giving hope that some neurodegenerative diseases could be reversed.

Our teams are working around the clock to push the boundaries of medical research.