Dr Erin Heyer

After completing her undergraduate studies in biology at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California, Erin undertook PhD studies in the laboratory of Melissa Moore at UMass Medical School in Worcester, Massachusetts.  Her graduate work focused on the study of translation by single ribosomes and the
Senior Research Officer

After completing her undergraduate studies in biology at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California, Erin undertook PhD studies in the laboratory of Melissa Moore at UMass Medical School in Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Her graduate work focused on the study of translation by single ribosomes and the optimization of RNA-Seq library preparation to minimise bias.  As both projects involved deep sequencing, Erin began to explore the field of computational biology to complement her work in biochemistry.

Following the completion of her PhD, Erin took a position at Moderna Therapeutics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  After this stint in biotech, she moved back to academic research as a postdoctoral researcher at Garvan.  In the Transcriptomic Research Lab, Erin balances her time between the lab bench and the computer, studying genomic rearrangements and their impact on cancer.

Research Interests

Transcriptomics
Computational biology
Genomic rearrangements

Education

2015 – PhD Biochemistry, RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA
2007 – BS Biology, Harvey Mudd College, USA

Selected Publications

Heyer, EE and Moore, MJ. Redefining the Translational Status of 80S Monosomes. Cell 2016; 164, 757–769.

Heyer, EE, Özadam, H, Ricci, EP, Cenik, C and Moore, MJ. An optimized kit-free method for making strand-specific deep sequencing libraries from RNA fragments. Nucleic Acids Research 2015; 43, e2.

Ricci, EP, Kucukural, A, Cenik, C, Mercier, BC, Singh, G, Heyer, EE, Ashar-Patel, A, Peng, L and Moore, MJ.  Staufen1 senses overall transcript secondary structure to regulate translation. Nat Struct Mol Biol 2014; 21, 26–35.

Person portrait

Dr Erin Heyer

Research group