Dr Kenny Ip

Research Officer - Eating Disorders Lab

Dr Kenny Ip

In 2010, I graduated from my bachelor degree in biological science majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Western Sydney. In 2011, I moved to the University of Sydney to do my honour’s year with Dr Mark Douglas looking at the molecular mechanism of microRNA-122 on the de

Research Level

Research Officer

Biography

In 2010, I graduated from my bachelor degree in biological science majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Western Sydney. In 2011, I moved to the University of Sydney to do my honour’s year with Dr Mark Douglas looking at the molecular mechanism of microRNA-122 on the development of Hepatitis C Virus-induced fatty liver disease.

 

During my Ph.D. study, I investigated the functional role of transcription factors (Lhx1 and Otx2) that are critical for the development of the embryonic brain in mouse during gastrulation stage. Since then I have developed a great interest also to look into how the brain function in order to orchestrate the behavioral change in response to stress.

 

Hence I started my post-doctoral research career in the neuroscience from Professor Herbert Herzog’s laboratory in the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia. Since becoming a Postdoctoral fellow I have been interested in investigating various aspects of feeding behavior and obesity development. In particular I have been interested how stress is influencing appetite and energy homeostasis.

In 2010, I graduated from my bachelor degree in biological science majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Western Sydney. In 2011, I moved to the University of Sydney to do my honour’s year with Dr Mark Douglas looking at the molecular mechanism of microRNA-122 on the development of Hepatitis C Virus-induced fatty liver disease.

 

During my Ph.D. study, I investigated the functional role of transcription factors (Lhx1 and Otx2) that are critical for the development of the embryonic brain in mouse during gastrulation stage. Since then I have developed a great interest also to look into how the brain function in order to orchestrate the behavioral change in response to stress.

 

Hence I started my post-doctoral research career in the neuroscience from Professor Herbert Herzog’s laboratory in the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia. Since becoming a Postdoctoral fellow I have been interested in investigating various aspects of feeding behavior and obesity development. In particular I have been interested how stress is influencing appetite and energy homeostasis.

Awards and Honours

2019 AACBS 13th Research Excellence Award
2019 Nominated speaker for the 12th International NPY·PYY·PP 2019 meeting
2019 Nominated speaker for the 21st Genes, Brain and Behavior meeting 2019
2019 Outstanding Postdoctoral Scholar Travel Award, International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society
2017 Nominated speaker for the Hypothalamic Neuroscience and Neuroendocrinology Australasia (HNNA) symposium ECR presentations
2016 Best poster prize from the Metabolic Diseases; Breakthroughs Discoveries in Diabetes & Obesity conference, Melbourne
2011-2014 International Postgraduate Research Scholarship
2011-2014 Australia Postgraduate Award
2011-2014 Children’s Medical Research Institute Postgraduate Research Scholarship
2013 and 2014 Postgraduate Research Support Scheme, University of Sydney
2010 Summer Research Scholarship, University of Sydney

Education

2014 - PhD (Medicine), University of Sydney - Australia
2011 - BSc 1st Class Honours (Cell Pathology), University of Sydney - Australia
2010 - BSc (Biochemistry and molecular biology), University of Western Sydney - Australia

Selected Publications

P.hD Project: https://garvanpostgrad.applynow.net.au/jobs/G31-phd-in-neuroscience-eating-disorders-5-projects

IP, C. K., HERZOG, H. & ZHANG, L. 2019. Chronic stress and energy homoeostasis. Aging (Albany NY).

LEE, N. J., QI, Y., ENRIQUEZ, R. F.,IP, C. K. & HERZOG, H. 2019. Lack of NPY in neurotensin neurons leads to a lean phenotype. Neuropeptides, 101994.

IP, C. K., ZHANG, L., FARZI, A., QI, Y., CLARKE, I., REED, F., SHI, Y. C., ENRIQUEZ, R., DAYAS, C., GRAHAM, B., BEGG, D., BRUNING, J. C., LEE, N. J., HERNANDEZ-SANCHEZ, D., GOPALASINGAM, G., KOLLER, J., TASAN, R., SPERK, G. & HERZOG, H. 2019. Amygdala NPY Circuits Promote the Development of Accelerated Obesity under Chronic Stress Conditions. Cell Metab, 30, 111-128 e6.

(Highlighted in Nature Review Endocrinology https://www.nature.com/articles/s41574-019-0211-9 )

FARZI, A.*, LAU, J.*,IP, C. K.*, QI, Y., SHI, Y. C., ZHANG, L., TASAN, R., SPERK, G. & HERZOG, H. 2018. Arcuate nucleus and lateral hypothalamic CART neurons in the mouse brain exert opposing effects on energy expenditure. Elife, 7. (*Equal First author)

ZHANG, L., IP, C. K., LEE, I. J., QI, Y., REED, F., KARL, T., LOW, J. K., ENRIQUEZ, R. F., LEE, N. J., BALDOCK, P. A. & HERZOG, H. 2018. Diet-induced adaptive thermogenesis requires neuropeptide FF receptor-2 signalling. Nat Commun, 9, 4722.

LOH, K., SHI, Y. C., WALTERS, S., BENSELLAM, M., LEE, K., DEZAKI, K., NAKATA, M., IP, C. K., CHAN, J. Y., GURZOV, E. N., THOMAS, H. E., WAIBEL, M., CANTLEY, J., KAY, T. W., YADA, T., LAYBUTT, D. R., GREY, S. T. & HERZOG, H. 2017. Inhibition of Y1 receptor signaling improves islet transplant outcome. Nat Commun, 8, 490.

IP, C. K.*, FOSSAT*, N., JONES, V., LAMONERIE, T., TAM, P. P. 2014. Head formation: OTX2 regulates Dkk1 and Lhx1 activity in the anterior mesendoderm. Development, 141, 3859-67.(*Equal First author) - Highlighted in Development 2014 141: e2002

FOSSAT, N.*, IP, C. K.*, JONES, V. J., STUDDERT, J. B., KHOO, P. L., LEWIS, S. L., POWER, M., TOURLE, K., LOEBEL, D. A., KWAN, K. M., BEHRINGER, R. R., TAM, P. P. 2015. Context-specific function of the LIM homeobox 1 transcription factor in head formation of the mouse embryo. Development, 142, 2069-79. (*Equal First author), recommended article by F1000 Prime (https://f1000.com/prime/725498766)

SIBBRITT T*, IP, C. K.*, KHOO PL, WILKIE E, JONES V, SUN JQJ, SHEN JX, PENG G, HAN JJ, JING N, OSTEIL P, RAMIALISON M, TAM PPL, FOSSAT N. 2018. A gene regulatory network anchored by LIM homeobox 1 (LHX1) for embryonic head development. Genesis (*Equal First author)

SHI, Y. C.,IP, C. K., REED, F., SARRUF, D. A., WULFF, B. S. & HERZOG, H. 2017. Y5 receptor signalling counteracts the anorectic effects of PYY3-36 in diet-induced obese mice. J Neuroendocrinol, 29.

TENNILLE SIBBRITT, VANESSA JONES, CHI KIN IP, EMILIE WILKIE, JOANNE SHEN, JANE SUN, RENÉE RAWSON, JOSHUA.STUDDERT, STUART K. ARCHER, MIRANA RAMIALISON, NICOLAS FOSSAT, PATRICK P. L. TAM. 2017. Deciphering the gene regulatory network necessary for head formation. Mechanisms of Development. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mod.2017.04.401)

TAM, P. P., FOSSAT, N., WILKIE, E., LOEBEL, D. A., IP, C. K. & RAMIALISON, M. 2016. Formation of the Embryonic Head in the Mouse: Attributes of a Gene Regulatory Network. Curr Top Dev Biol, 117, 497-521.